SERP

Search Engine Result Page.

From: Wikipedia

A search engine results page (SERP) is the page displayed by a search engine in response to a query by a searcher. The main component of the SERP is the listing of results that are returned by the search engine in response to a keyword query, although the page may also contain other results such as advertisements.[1]

The results are of two general types, organic (i.e., retrieved by the search engine’s algorithm) and sponsored (i.e., advertisements). The results are normally ranked by relevance to the query. Each result displayed on the SERP normally includes a title, a link that points to the actual page on the Web and a short description showing where the keywords have matched content within the page for organic results. For sponsored results, the advertiser chooses what to display.

Due to the huge number of items that are available or related to the query there usually are several SERPs in response to a single search query as the search engine or the user’s preferences restrict viewing to a subset of results per page. Each succeeding page will tend to have lower ranking or lower relevancy results. Just like the world of traditional print media and its advertising, this enables competitive pricing for page real estate, but compounded by the dynamics of consumer expectations and intent— unlike static print media where the content and the advertising on every page is the same all of the time for all viewers, despite such hard copy being localized to some degree, usually geographic, like state, metro-area, city, or neighborhoods.

From: wordstream.com

Search engine results pages are web pages served to users when they search for something online using a search engine, such as Google. The user enters their search query (often using specific terms and phrases known as keywords), upon which the search engine presents them with a SERP.

Every SERP is unique, even for search queries performed on the same search engine using the same keywords or search queries. This is because virtually all search engines customize the experience for their users by presenting results based on a wide range of factors beyond their search terms, such as the user’s physical location, browsing history, and social settings. Two SERPs may appear identical, and contain many of the same results, but will often feature subtle differences.

The appearance of search engine results pages is constantly in flux due to experiments conducted by Google, Bing, and other search engine providers to offer their users a more intuitive, responsive experience. This, combined with emerging and rapidly developing technologies in the search space, mean that the SERPs of today differ greatly in appearance from their older predecessors.

VP

Value Proposition.

According to WikiPedia :

A value proposition is a statement which clearly identifies benefits consumers get when buying a particular product or service. It should convince consumers that this product or service is better than others on the market. This proposition can lead to a competitive advantage when consumers pick that particular product or service over other competitors because they receive greater value.

The phrase “value proposition” (VP) is credited to Michael Lanning and Edward Michaels, who first used the term in a 1988 staff paper for the consulting firm McKinsey and co. In the paper, which was entitled “a business is a value delivery system”, the authors define value proposition as “a clear, simple statement of the benefits, both tangible and intangible, that the company will provide, along with the approximate price it will charge each customer segment for those benefits”. In a modern, clear cut definition, Labeaux defines a value proposition as a statement that clearly identifies what benefits a customer will receive by purchasing a particular product or service from a vendor. According to Hassan, however, there is no specific definition for Value Proposition

More resources related to VP (Value Proposition):

http://conversionxl.com/value-proposition-examples-how-to-create/

http://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelskok/2013/06/14/4-steps-to-building-a-compelling-value-proposition/#2c48656f1f2c

USP

Unique Selling Proposition. Sometimes Unique Selling Position. Synonymous with VP.

According to Wikipedia :

The unique selling proposition (USP) or unique selling point is a marketing concept first proposed as a theory to explain a pattern in successful advertising campaigns of the early 1940s. The USP states that such campaigns made unique propositions to customers that convinced them to switch brands. The term was developed by television advertising pioneer Rosser Reeves of Ted Bates & Company. Theodore Levitt, a professor at Harvard Business School, suggested that, “Differentiation is one of the most important strategic and tactical activities in which companies must constantly engage.”[1] The term has been used to describe one’s “personal brand” in the marketplace.[2] Today, the term is used in other fields or just casually to refer to any aspect of an object that differentiates it from similar objects.

 

 

According to entrepreneur.com :

The factor or consideration presented by a seller as the reason that one product or service is different from and better than that of the competition .

 

 

Further reading on USP from KissMetrics

KPI

Key Performance Indicator(s).

A key performance indicator (KPI) is a business metric used to evaluate factors that are crucial to the success of an organization. KPIs differ per organization; business KPIs may be net revenue or a customer loyalty metric, while government might consider unemployment rates. – Source

That’s a little general, here is one more for SEO CRITICAL SEO KPIs

CTA

The part of a marketing message that attempts to persuade a person to perform a desired action.

A call to action aims to persuade a visitor to perform a certain act immediately. “Buy Now!” and “Register Today!” are some common examples. The call to action is intended to improve the market’s response rate to the ad copy, as its absence may cause a visitor to forget about the ad and move on to other things.

Source: http://www.marketingterms.com/dictionary/call_to_action/

PPC

PPC stands for pay-per-click, a model of internet marketing in which advertisers pay a fee each time one of their ads is clicked. Essentially, it’s a way of buying visits to your site, rather than attempting to “earn” those visits organically.

Search engine advertising is one of the most popular forms of PPC. It allows advertisers to bid for ad placement in a search engine’s sponsored links when someone searches on a keyword that is related to their business offering. For example, if we bid on the keyword “PPC software,” our ad might show up in the very top spot on the Google results page.

http://www.wordstream.com/ppc

SEM

Search engine marketing (SEM) is a form of Internet marketing that involves the promotion of websites by increasing their visibility in search engine results pages (SERPs) primarily through paid advertising.[1] SEM may incorporate search engine optimization (SEO), which adjusts or rewrites website content and site architecture to achieve a higher ranking in search engine results pages to enhance pay per click (PPC) listings.[2]

Search engine optimization consultants expanded their offerings to help businesses learn about and use the advertising opportunities offered by search engines, and new agencies focusing primarily upon marketing and advertising through search engines emerged. The term “Search Engine Marketing” was popularized by Danny Sullivan in 2001[11] to cover the spectrum of activities involved in performing SEO, managing paid listings at the search engines, submitting sites to directories, and developing online marketing strategies for businesses, organizations, and individuals.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_engine_marketing

CRO

In internet marketing, conversion optimization, or conversion rate optimization (CRO) is a system for increasing the percentage of visitors to a website that convert into customers,[1] or more generally, take any desired action on a webpage.[2] It is commonly referred to as CRO.

Online conversion rate optimization (or website optimization) was born out of the need of e-commerce marketers to improve their website’s performance in the aftermath of the dot-com bubble. As competition grew on the web during the early 2000s, website analysis tools started appearing and an awareness of website usability rose. This prompted internet marketers to become more measurable with their marketing tactics and focus on improving the website’s user experience. In 2004, new tools were introduced which enabled internet marketers to experiment with website design and content variations to determine which layouts, copy text, offers and images would perform best. This gained more traction in 2007 with the introduction of the free Google Website Optimizer.[3] A research study conducted among internet marketers in 2014 showed that 59% of respondents thought that CRO was “crucial to their overall digital marketing strategy”.[4]

Conversion rate optimization shares many of its basic principles with direct response marketing – an approach to marketing that emphasizes tracking, testing and on-going improvement. Direct marketing was popularized in the early twentieth century and was supported by the formation of industry groups such as the Direct Marketing Association which formed in 1917.[5]

Like modern day conversion rate optimization, direct response marketers also practice A/B split-testing, response tracking and audience testing to optimize mail, radio and print campaigns.[6]

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conversion_rate_optimization